Drumroll for the Belizean Avocado

The Belizean avocado season lasts only a few short months. Unlike the Hass avocado that is available in Mexico and the USA, Belizeans get to enjoy local avocados for only a few weeks a year.

Avocados are also called ‘pear’ in Belize. The more widely used name for it is the Kriol word, ‘pyaa’ (pi-yah). Our avocados come in varying sizes and textures. Just as the Hass avocado has unwavering support, Belizeans are very proud of the much larger varieties of avocado that grow in Belize.

 

The most well liked and hailed variety is referred to as ‘butter pear’ and grows bountifully in the northern part of the country. Known for its tapered end, it also bears the Spanish name of ‘mantequilla’. This refers to the fact that the avocado has a butter-like texture; when mashed, it can be used as a spread on any kind of bread.

 

Yes, avocados are used primarily in guacamole in other parts of the world, but in Belize, it is sliced and served alongside just about every meal. It is a breakfast side, and is especially good as part of the evening meal. During the avocado season it is as normal to see a slice of avocado right next to the fried plantain when it is eaten at lunchtime with rice and beans, and it goes great with fresh flour tortillas and delicious Creole Bread.

 

Avocados cost about Bz$3 for one at the start of the season, but as they become more commonly available, prices can drop to as low as Bz$1 per. When dining in Belize during this short season, (usually, June to September), ask for a slice of avocado if you don’t see it served up with your meal.

 

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